LECOM Postbacc 2017-2018 Cycle

Discussion in 'Postbaccalaureate Programs' started by AaronBsox, Dec 27, 2016.

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  1. midawa

    midawa

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    Dec 26, 2015

    So this is just my 2 cents, take it or leave it. I came into the post-bacc in the same situation, didn't have the best undergrad grades or GPA. In undergrad I would do things last minute and study the night before exams, pretty much did the bare minimum to pass. When I got into this program I realized that it was a second chance and really my last chance at getting into medical school. Come in with that mindset and you will be fine. It definitely took me some time to learn how to study, which is why I did much better second semester compared to first. As long as you are fully dedicated to this program then it should translate into a medical school acceptance!

    Edit: I was accepted into the MS1 class starting in July!
     
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  3. PAtoDO

    PAtoDO

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    Jun 17, 2016
    Are the students in the program cooperative or competitive with each other ?
     
  4. midawa

    midawa

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    Most of the people in my class were cooperative with one another, we all helped each other for the most part. Shared different study guides or any interactive websites we found that were helpful. I never really got the competitive vibe from anyone.
     
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  5. DantheManimal

    DantheManimal

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    Yeah I agree with what the other said in terms of it not being competitive. We were all there for each other and always hooked each other up with notes, Anki decks, and whatever else we were using. If you're nervous about undergrad scores, just consider this a fresh start. I had a bad overall undergrad GPA (3.0), but I studied like a lunatic and wound up with above a 3.5 in post bac. It can be done
     
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  6. nasuthar

    nasuthar

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    I agree, no one was competitive in the program and everyone helped each other in a constructive manner. They tell you on day one that there is no curve and they do not make exams and harder or easier based on class averages. Our year did quite well as a class, but they did not try and pull a fast one on us and make everything more difficult all of a sudden. They want you to work together, you'll have to work as a team at the hospital when your a doctor anyways.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
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  7. Medfuture001

    Medfuture001

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    Hello everyone,
    I was also in this year's Post-Bacc and will be an incoming MS1 this July. As others have said, this is a great program that provides a set of requirements and a challenge, which if successful and professional, leads to a medical school acceptance. The Post-Bacc provides students with a clean slate, so that ones performance in the next 8 months proves their readiness for medical school. The program enables us to all be cooperative, not competitive, as there is no curve. During orientation, they even encourage group studying and helping one another out, as they have MS1 spots reserved for those who are successful in the program.

    Personally, I would say that if I could have know what study method works best for me and each subject, I would have been much less stressed and more successful throughout the first semester of the program. This was also something that was stressed in orientation and was a common concern of my friends too. In my case, I barely passed the first Physiology exam, as I began the semester with my undergraduate study habits and spent time watching TV series more than I should have. The Post-Bac 15 credits is not the same as undergrad 15 credits. Thankfully, I was able to turn things around from exam 2 onward, as I also became part of a study group, which I consider integral to my success in the program. Over the first half of the first semester, I tried different study methods (ANKI, Outlining the Powerpoint, Summarizing, Single-slow review method, Practice Questions, Charts, etc.) until I found the ones that worked best for each subject. Again, everyone studies differently and finding what works for each person/subject is imperative.

    As an example, while not all of my friends found physiology practice questions helpful, I partially attribute my performance to practicing with BRS and Pretest Physiology questions, as they allowed me to gauge question styles/content I should expect on the exam. ANKI (Flashcards) was helpful for histology and charts were helpful in Microbiology and Pharmacology. In Anatomy, I used the 3D visualizer to have a visual perspective of concepts discussed in the anatomy clinical supplement, which will really become everyones best friend in the spring semester. KNOW your clinical supplement, especially as the semester progresses!!! I won’t really get in to each class, as previous posters have provided excellent explanations of the courses. I must say, for pharmacology, it is imperative to be proactive in that class and study the drugs and differences almost daily, for the two exams in the Spring. This was the class that was the most difficult for our class, as it had the highest failure rate. I did very well in the class and if any clarification is required with respect to the material, the professors are very responsive to emails and requests for appointments.

    Overall, I really recommend studying as hard as possible in the Fall semester, as that will provide a GPA buffer for Spring, leave you with less stress, and will allow you to get your acceptance letter sooner. Students with a Fall GPA of 3.4+ get their letter first, then 3.2+, and others after final grades.
    I myself was the opposite, I had a low 3+ GPA in the Fall, but had a 3.7 in the Spring. I had also not taken the MCAT, as I had applied with an AIS score, so I knew I had to step up in the Spring. I knew the study methods that worked for me, so I was able to do very well.


    Aside from the educational aspects, life in Erie, PA is nice, most of the restaurants, retailers, and amenities found in larger cities are available, plus there are less distractions, providing ample study time. Personally, one of my non-academic concerns was the weather, being that I was from Florida. While everyone will try and prepare/scare you with the idea of lake effect snow, I can’t say that this was a major hassle, at least for me this year. I should provide the disclaimer that I lived right across the street from school and have been told the winter was worse three years ago. I was able to easily drive my front wheel drive sedan with all-season tires after a short learning curve. Don’t forget to buy an ice scraper if you have a car!
    Additionally, there are larger cities within 1.5-2 hours that one could visit during extended breaks, if that is something you enjoy.

    I wish everyone the best of luck and if there are any specific questions, don’t hesitate to ask.
     
  8. DexterMorganSK

    DexterMorganSK The Blood Guy

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    @Medfuture001

    Thanks for your feedback and congratulations on the acceptance. Can you please (and anyone else) talk a little more about how you studied for Physio, Pharm and Anatomy. Was it mostly BRS + Class ppts + notes?
     
  9. JD1957

    JD1957

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    so this is what you do after retiring from winning championships?
     
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  10. drkobebryant

    drkobebryant 2+ Year Member

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    Mar 12, 2013
    Someone's gotta heal all the broken ankles and shattered hearts I've given throughout my career.

    Sent from my Pixel XL using Tapatalk
     
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  11. midawa

    midawa

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    Dec 26, 2015
    I made notecards for every class. Sometimes I would only review them once or twice, but I at least had to review the information again while making the notecards.

    So Physio, I pretty much used the notes I took from class. What I liked to do is preview the lectures before class by typing the information and pictures/diagrams from the powerpoint into word documents. Then during class I would continue to take notes in the notes section of the powerpoint slide. After class ( I tried to do this before dinner if we got done early enough) I would re-type all the notes I took during class into the word document I had previously made of the powerpoint information. This allowed me to review the information almost three times (once previewing, once during class and once when I went through the notes we took during class). If time allowed I would then go through that entire note-packet that night. I did this for almost every class, but it really helped in physiology. For me the BRS books really didn't help me, but they did help a lot of my friends so it just depends on how you learn.

    Pharmacology, I did the same thing as above with how I took my notes. Pre-viewed, took notes during class, and then re-typed my class notes into my word document. I made drug charts and lists and wrote practice questions as I went through the material to help myself understand the information clinically. I also made one sheet cheat sheets per lecture to help myself retain material (this was actually a suggestion of one of our physiology professors). I didn't really struggle as bad with pharmacology, but our class as a whole did which someone had the exact numbers above.

    Anatomy, I did the same thing with my notes and made a lot of flashcards with pictures (ANKI!). Learning the clinical supplement is key to this class, if you are ever on a time crunch I suggest reviewing that. You will also learn what the professors like to test more on based on how much time they spend on a topic. They really like nerve supply, lymph drainage, and anastomoses. Don't worry, I didn't know what that word meant before anatomy, but essentially it's the blood connections in the body that allow a route around a blockage.
     
  12. byahnoob

    byahnoob 2+ Year Member

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    Dec 17, 2014
    Sorry if this was asked before but how long is the turnaround time after all files have been received?
     
  13. E92CR7

    E92CR7

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    Apr 22, 2017
    What are your stats if you don't mind me asking? I am also Pre-Dental, applying in a few weeks.
     
  14. nasuthar

    nasuthar

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    Jul 31, 2015
    Okay now that the semester is over and I got some free time now to write up the post-bacc “how-to” guide that I promised a while ago on this forum. This guide pertains only to the post bacc 2016-2017 year so upcoming years may differ slightly as changes are made to curriculum and professors teaching courses. So please do not use this guide as an end all be all but more of a write up on what to expect out of the classes you will be taking. Some background information on me is that I have previously taken Physiology as an undergrad and majored in Biochemistry. Other than those two classes, it was my first time taking any of this material so as I write this out you will see some comments on how my study style is slightly different for every class as well as adjustments in study style I had to make for certain classes. I think that for the post-bacc, your study style must be dynamic and adaptable since every class’ material is different and you have multiple professors teaching a class. Like some students have previously said, this program is quite literally a boot-camp for medical school. LECOM already sees the qualities of a doctor in you, but you haven’t proven your academic power to go through med school just yet. This is your chance to show them that you have what it takes to succeed in med school or at least the boot camp will kick you into the right mindset to be prepared to succeed in med school. I honestly didn’t know what to expect, and this program felt like a boot camp that forced me to become a better student…a med school ready student now. After this program, I feel confident that I will be a successful med student. The first semester is relatively easier than the second semester, but I only say this in hindsight. What I mean by that is that both semesters are difficult, but for different reasons. First semester is all about getting used to the testing style, the lecturing style, the clinical based questions. You will try new study strategies and hopefully by the end of the first semester you have come to a “distillation” of what methods work best for you. For example I joined a study group of just a few students which ballooned to almost a dozen students. We tried getting together as a group to go over the material together. We quickly found out that was a massive waste of a time because everyone learns at a different pace and what is hard for someone may be easy for someone else. Eventually we figured out that self-study or silent study with 1 or 2 partners works best for our whole group. Late into the first semester I finally figured out my best study habit and that is to silently study with a single partner. I like studying with a partner because we can keep each other on track and ask questions as needed. This worked for me, but it may not work for you. First semester is your opportunity to figure out what works for you. In addition, this is also your opportunity to figure out the best way to get information into your head. While studying for most classes, I usually have my ppt slides out on my laptop and a blank piece of printer paper to take short notes on. I usually will just write out key words or major topics that I find difficult and use this note sheet in the future to figure out what I need to study. A lot of students like to take the lecture objectives (found beginning of every ppt) and write out notes on paper/laptop based on just those. Lecture objectives are generally high yield and will net you a lot of point on test day. I just like to refer to the lecture objectives after studying and see if I can answer the questions or expand on the topic in my head and see how much I can recall. I’ll add to my notes anything I should go over if im not strong at a certain lecture objective.



    Physiology: This is the first class you will be taught your first semester and is arguably the toughest class you will take first semester. (I thought Microbiology was harder, but that probably has to do with me taking phys previously). The first day of class is pretty simple to get you used to the lecturing style, but after that you are running. Because you are in class for about 3hrs a day on this subject, you cannot simply use the weekends to study or a few nights before the exam to study for this class, you must study on a daily basis. I would normally go to the gym and eat dinner to clear my mind after lecture and then review the material that was taught that day. Most of the time I would be able to review the material the same night and finish it leaving the next morning free, but again if you’ve never taken phys then you will have to continue reviewing the next morning/over the weekend. Usually an hour before class, I would suggest previewing the days material as ppts are posted several days in advance for you. This will definitely help with understanding material during lecture. I didn’t start doing this until second semester, but I can see the benefit from starting early on especially in physiology and maybe biochemistry. The key to physiology is that it has less to do with memorizing the material, but more with understanding the concepts behind every process that is presented to you. What I did was after reviewing a concept, I would mentally rehearse the process in my head until I can go through it without referring to a diagram or whatnot. You must have a very good understanding of physiology in order to answer the questions they will be asking you on the exams. Remember that you are now in medical school, so they will be asking many clinically relevant questions. What this means is take note of any diseases that are presented in class/notes and understand the physiology behind those diseases. Know their presentation and how you test for them/diagnose them. I simply just got a piece of paper and listed all the diseases in a list and kind of just mentally asked myself what physiologic function is messed up, how the patient would present it, etc. Doing this will at least give you a few points on the exam. The school provides these EXCEL sessions to help you with your test taking strategies and they may be helpful to you or maybe not. For me, I didn’t find it that helpful and stopped going since the practice questions they asked in the sessions were generally not in line with what was asked in the exams. EXCEL is not mandatory, so you don’t have to go if you don’t feel like its helpful to you. The first exam is a week after school starts. They do this to basically get you used to the exam taking style, and kick you into studying since some students may fall back into their old undergrad ways and study last minute. Basically, this exam serves to scare you into studying for future exams. Its not worth as much as the other physio exams so doing poorly is okay. At the same time, this exam is only slightly easier than the other physio exams. Just because it’s a week of material doesn’t mean you can slack off! Use this opportunity of relatively less material to be tested on to your advantage and get a good grade on this exam! The key to this program is to get the highest possible grade in every class you can since you will only have 3 days to study for your cumulative final nothing is stressful as borderline grades going into the final. Many students swear by the BRS physiology book for its practice questions. I used this book and it was helpful, but not a godsend. I never read the textbook, but I know some students that did. I would only refer to the text book for understanding of difficult concepts, otherwise it is a lot of reading time which could be used to simply study the ppts which are more high yield. REMEMBER, understanding everything is key to physiology! Be able to know every process or concept like the back of your hand and think of ways those processes can get messed up and how they would present in a patient. For example if you learn about how the Na/K pump works to maintain an ion gradient on the cell membrane, what would happen if it stopped working? Always ask yourself and your friends questions as you study the material. I found that having your friends quiz you on the material tremendously helped me study for classes. But remember that you simply CANNOT memorize your way through this class as you will not be successful. Don’t memorize, UNDERSTAND IT! You also have several professors that teach this class and come in to teach their respective units so be prepared for change in teaching styles as you move from one unit to another. I think our class had 3 professors: Johanneson that taught the electrophysiology/CNS, Lee that taught cardio/resp, and Jones that taught renal. Most students struggled with Lee most likely due to his lecturing style where the slides don’t have much information in them and the subject was relatively hard. I would try and take really good notes if he teaches you guys and refer to the textbook to solidify your understanding of the material. This class also only has 3 exams: exam 1 is 1 week of material, exam 2 with 2 weeks, and exam 3 with 3 weeks of material. As you can see, this is LECOM’s way of gradually ramping up the amount of material you will need to study for each exam. Be warned that just because your exam is 3 weeks away doesn’t mean its time to chill and party all weekend. This is a trick, so don’t fall for it. Exam 3 is the most difficult of the semester due to the amount of material and focuses on 2 of your hardest classes of the semester. Start studying right away, but don’t go so hard you burn out.


    Biochemistry: Well this was my undergrad major and I barely studied for this class so I’m not sure how much advice I can give for this subject so take this with a grain of salt. I guess this class is similar to physiology (high difficulty) that you will have to focus more on understanding the concepts rather than brute memorization, but some memorization will be necessary at times. Again know your diseases and clinical presentations. The class will start off straightforward and get progressively harder. Dr. Speelman will be a godsend for many students as she will teach this class in a way that you will understand and her exam questions are pretty fair. Generally any topic that a lot of time is spent on will be high yield on the exam. Theres a lot of information to be learnt in this class especially if you’ve never taken biochem or are weak in this subject. Focus on the Learning Objectives and be able to answer those, this is probably the most high yield method of study for this class. I’ll let another former post-bacc fill in on the “how to” for this class.


    Histology: This class I thought was very enjoyable with all of the interesting images of tissues that we look at and would rate it more medium than easy in level of difficulty. At first everything may kind of look the same since most tissues are stained purple and red, but after spending some time it will become a lot easier as you figure this class out. Our class was taught mostly by Professor Labranche and she speaks very fast so be prepared for her lecturing style. The material is fairly straightforward and I would say this is like a lightweight taste of how anatomy is taught. Know the theory from lecture, and especially know how to identify things on the histo slides. I would suggest googling images of labeled histology slides to help you get better at identifying histological structures. This will help you in the sense that your lecture slides and exam slides will not be the same so being able to tell whats what in different slides helps a ton. I did notice that some of the pictures on the exam were the same or similar to ones I saw online. There aren’t too many slides per lecture, so knowing everything from the slides is essential as detail questions do pop up often. This is also the first class I think where the professors start giving you 6-10 answer choices for some questions on the exam. What this means is that you really want to know the material and be able to mentally answer to yourself before looking at the choices otherwise it can be daunting. Luckily, I don’t remember them asking any clinically relevant questions in this class so that helps big time. Yes you can memorize your way through this class. Other than that, this class is one of those 1 unit classes, so take it seriously because a fail is a fail and you will not be able to matriculate. The last histo exam (I think exam 6) was significantly more difficult than the rest of the exam, so prepare for that. I lost my A because of that exam. The final is also somewhat difficult in the sense that you will be looking at multiple tissues that you’ve learned and have to tell what kind of tissue it is. Histologically, smooth muscle, connective tissue, and nerves almost look exactly the same, so remember to figure out what little differences there are between the tissues to properly ID them otherwise those 10 answer choice questions will mess you up real bad.


    Microbiology: This class was my worst grade first semester though most would consider it “medium difficulty”. This class is literally just memorization and not many conceptual questions are asked. I generally struggle in memorization classes like this, but I was able to use this class as a learning opportunity to get better for future classes like this (virology). I hate memorization so I had to get good at that real quick since a lot of med school material is memorization. The professors suggest you make bacteria charts to help you study and memorize all of the details about each bacteria. This was great advice and I wish I followed that advice starting from the beginning. You must know the ins and outs of every bacteria that is presented here and know every minute detail that’s in the lecture slides. The first exam doesn’t have too many points so this will be their way of giving you a little taste of what to expect on the exam. I didn’t really study that hard for the first exam and got a C, and that kicked me into really studying for the second exam. I studied my butt off and still got a C+ on the second exam. I was annoyed at my grade when it came out, so I had to figure out why I was doing so poorly even though I studied so hard. A few days after the exam is the exam review session where you get the opportunity to look through your exam on your laptop for an hour before lecture. I used this time to literally figure out how each question was written whether I got it right or wrong. I tried to recall what went through my head trying to answer the question and asked why I got something wrong. I finally saw a pattern and adjusted my study method for the final. To my surprise, I was able to pull up to a B after doing really well on the final. Don’t mess up like me! Create bacteria charts from the beginning and make sure you know each bacteria inside and out as well as clinical presentation on the patient. The exam questions are also mostly 2nd order here so again make sure you know the ins and outs of every bacteria.


    Cell Biology & Genetics: I’m just gonna clump these two classes together since they are mostly taught by the same professor (Hussein and Hudder). Cell biology should mostly be review from general biology and genetics is pretty much also review from the genetics we’ve all learned in gen bio. I would put these two classes under the “easy” category so long as you spend sufficient amount of time studying for the material. Again don’t get complacent and brush off these easy classes and not study for them. Husein has in class group quizzes and are graded for a small amount of points, but a point is a point. The points here aren’t that important, but the quiz questions are. Some of these questions seem to appear on the exam/final in verbatim or at least very similar. Sometimes the questions will be hard and Hussein will let you know he won’t be testing you on that question. I guess he adds them in to make you think. You can’t write down the questions he asks in class, but a lot of people will flag their ppt slides that are relevant to the question that was asked since you can have your laptop/notes out during the quizzes. Don’t think about typing up the questions or taking pictures


    Critical Thinking: This would be another one of those “easy A” classes. This class is mostly self-directed so the first 3 exams are just simply word roots in medicine and is fairly easy as long as you go through the online reading and do the practice quizzes on the website. I pretty much studied up to an hour for the first 3 exams for this, so that should tell you how simple this is. Theres no trick here, just remember to actually put in the little time for this. But aim to get 100% on the first 3 exams as this class starts to get a little difficult later into the semester as you will have to do an assigned reading on a journal article (we had the now retracted Wakefield paper linking vaccines to autism) and will have to answer questions on it on the exam. According to the exam breakdown, most of the class did pretty bad on that exam so those buffer points from previous exams will come out to be handy if you need it. Also there is no final for this class! One other note is that there are a few online quizzes for points and no reminder email is sent out for you to complete them. So do the online quizzes ASAP or set a reminder for yourself to complete them by the deadline. Remind your friends, cause theres always someone who forgets.


    2nd Semester stuff:

    Immunology: This class is taught by Hussein and the class should be fairly straightforward in the sense that you’ve already had this guy previously and already know his teaching style. Again there are in class quizzes and questions appear on exam in verbatim. Just to give you guys an idea on how easy it is to fall behind in this program, I got sick the first week of second semester and barely studied for 3 days. As a result, I got a C on the one and only immunology exam since this is a 1 unit class. I ended up over-studying for the final just to make sure I didn’t fail the class. Remember you cannot fail a class, so I dodged a bullet here. This also where your nice first semester GPA buffer comes in handy as insurance if **** hits the fan, but failing is still not an option. Difficulty: medium (the material is easy, but there was a daunting amount of information presented for a 1 unit class. Yes you can memorize ur way through


    Virology: This class is also taught by Hussein and again in class quizzes are helpful. I studied for this class the same way I was supposed to study for microbiology and did great on both of the exams. (I guess I finally learned how to study for microbio/viro at this point). Just like microbio, exam questions will mostly be clinical based but way less second order questions. Remember, know the weird/minute differences in viruses and their symptoms/presentation in patients. I didn’t tell you this, but Hussein loves Hantavirus. Difficulty: easy. Yes you can memorize


    Pathology: This class starts off fairly easy, but progressively gets more difficult every exam. Don’t think it will be an easy A just because you did well on the first exam like I did! This class is 4 units and getting an A in this class is attainable for a nice GPA boost so long you study properly, but I neglected this class and only looked at the ppt once or twice for the second exam and failed that exam. I had to study harder for 3rd/4th exam to basically maintain a B since I was out of the A range. Don’t neglect this class like me and get the A for those precious GPA points! This class is also mostly self-directed study and gives you a taste of the PBL/DS pathway life. Because of that, it validated my decision to go to the LDP pathway since at this point I know I do not perform with self directed study. Use your post-bacc first semester to guage which pathway will work for you. I was leaning towards PBL at the beginning, but as the semester progressed I learned that I actually perform better if I have guidance from lecture. You can use second semester to decide too, but acceptances start coming out in Jan/Feb for the 3.4+ students so it may not be an option to continue pondering what pathway to choose. The ppt for this class is posted sometimes on the day of self-study so at times you can’t study in advance if you have time before the actual “lecture” day. The ppts at times can be missing information as it is outlined in the Learning Objectives, so using the book in this class is probably a good idea. I didn’t use the book as much as I should’ve, but everyone I knew that did read the book did really well in the class. Before every exam, there is an in class q&a with the professor where you can ask questions to clarify on topics. We had professor Stevens and some students noticed that if no one asks questions she will basically go through the ppt slides and point out high yield info and basically tell you what and what not to study as well as give hints to whats on the exam. So if Stevens is the professor again next year, don’t be “that guy” who asks a million questions during the q&a sesh. There are in class quizzes on the day of the q&a session, so don’t miss points there. The quiz isn’t really any easier than the exam, so I would study for it as if I were studying for the exam. Luckily, Stevens will sometimes specify which lecture she is going to quiz on, but sometimes not. Difficulty: medium. Yes you can memorize.


    Anatomy: I’ve never taken anatomy prior to the post-bacc program and it was really difficult for me to start off, but it got progressively bearable after I figured out the way exam questions are written for this class. Even students that have previously taken undergrad anatomy have said that this class was harder, but as long as you figure out the testing style you should be good. I have no way to compare post-bacc anatomy to other anatomy classes, but I believe that the difficulty in this class really comes from the way exam questions are asked. Pointing to structures and naming them doesn’t exist on the exam. Rather, everything is clinically relevant. The only “name the anatomical structure” type of questions will be the histology questions that are asked. The histology portion of anatomy is basically like a continuation of the histology that was learnt in first semester, so don’t forget the histology you learned first semester! In addition, all of the histology you will learn will not be taught in lecture, it will be under directed study. Be sure to use the histology notes(class portal) and the virtual histology website posted on the class portal and refer to the book as needed. Histology is another one of those things that I neglected in anatomy and literally all of points I missed in this class came from histo. As for the actual anatomy, professor Kulesza talks pretty fast, but not as fast as Labranche and sets high expectations for students. Most of his anatomy slides are not well labeled, so they need to be filled in during lecture. Because the pace of lecture is fast, what I did was I would add arrows and labels to the pictures in the slides during lecture while a friend would focus on only taking notes. This would later be compiled after lecture to have a proper ppt that labeled and with notes. If you have Labranche teaching, then you won’t have to take as many notes/labels since her slides are generally filled in for you. On the Neck/Thorax, and Abdomen units, you wont have to take super good notes since Kulesza will provide you with notes on the class portal that you can use to study off of. These notes are very detailed and at times have more information than you need to know. You especially want to study the Neck notes inside and out and highlight the high yield info. This is arguable the hardest exam and the Neck notes saved me for this. (ended up being my best anatomy exam somehow). The other very very very very high yield item for anatomy is the Clincial Supplement that is posted on the portal. Many students have taken this file to a printshop and got it spiral bound. This book will probably be the #1 source of points you can get on exam day. It is pretty short for each unit, but try and read it every day and basically memorize it. A lot of exam questions will come out of this and on things sometimes not covered in lecture, but is covered on the exam. As for the anatomy forum quizzes, they are usually given on “anatomy forum” days which usually occur after all of the lectures for a given unit have been completed. This can range from a few days to a few weeks between lecture and the forum day. The best advice I can give about the forum quizzes is that do not take them lightly, treat them as if it is the actual exam day. A forum ppt is usually posted well in advance and usually contains 15-25 slides containing relevant clinical cases to the current unit. The best way to study for the forum quiz is to literally sit down and figure out the forum cases/questions and many times the clinical supplement will be very helpful in answering the forum questions. The time they gave us between the last Neck lecture and Neck forum was a single weekend. That was not enough time to go through such a complicated area of the body and be able to answer questions on the quiz and the average grade was a fail. In hindsight, focusing only on the forum ppt and the clinical supplement will be high yield for the forum quizzes if you are stretched for time. The quiz breakdown showed many students getting 1/10 and me not far from that. It was after this quiz I had to re-assess how I studied for anatomy. The key for me is to start off with the overly detailed notes to gain a foundation, then move onto the clinical supplement and forum and focus on those two things. Like I said, neck was my highest scoring anatomy exam and I credit that to me finally figuring out how to study properly for this class. The two exams after Neck, I didn’t score as high since pharmacology got mixed in and there were 4 weeks between exams. Nevertheless, I studied wayyy less for the last two anatomy exam just from the simple fact I knew exactly how to study for this class. Just to give you guys an idea, I spent maybe 4-6hrs studying for the anatomy exam 4/5 the day/night before the exam since most of my time went into studying for pharm. This doesn’t mean those exams were easy, what this means is you must be able to plan your studying schedule well. There is 4 weeks of material for the 4th and 5th exam so studying well in advance will give you ample time to focus on subjects like pharm. A lot of my friends and I found anatomy sticks pretty well in your brain even if you haven’t reviewed it in a week or two. So studying really well for anatomy in advance is key here since you will be pressed for pharm on exam 4/5. Exam 4 in 2nd semester is the hardest exam overall (Neck/exam 3 is hardest anatomy exam) just from the fact that it is based on 4 weeks of material meaning there is nearly 200 questions on the exam, 4hrs long, and includes your two hardest classes (anatomy/pharm). Exam 5 will also have 4 weeks of material, but is relatively easier in the sense that it is the easiest anatomy exam (pelvis). The final is pretty straightforward, focus on the clinical supplement, the forum ppts, the anatomy review session ppt, and know your Back/Spine anatomy well. Answer choices on the anatomy final are also relatively easier to eliminate vs the exams. Difficulty: more on the Hard side than Medium. Yes you can memorize your way though this class, but conceptualization helps too.
     
  15. nasuthar

    nasuthar

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    Pharmacology: This class doesn’t show up until at least half way through the semester which can be a good thing or bad thing depending on the way you look at it. I thought it was good in the sence they basically cram all of this class into two large exams and the final 3 days after the second pharm exam so you will basically have half of the material fresh in your brain for the final. Other students may see the benefit of having pharm crammed in the end differently though. It is really subjective on an individual basis as far as if anatomy or pharm is harder and just depends on what you are better at. If you are better at brute memorization, then anatomy will be easier. Pharm on the other hand has a lot of physiology mixed into it, as well as all of the drug names. So not only will you have to be able to think the same way you did in physiology, but you will have to memorize all of the drugs presented and their side effects, indications, contraindications, etc. This is what makes pharm hard since you will literally have to be good at both memorization and thinking conceptually on physiological terms. What this means is, PAY ATTENTION to physiology first semester (especially CNS and electrophysiology) and don’t forget these things, this will make pharm a whole lot easier since most of the physio in pharm will literally be review from physio. So not having to spend a bunch of time re learning the physio behind the pharmacokinetics/dynamics will save you a ton of time which you can use to memorize the drug’s mechanisms of action, indications, side effects, etc. At times during this class it can be daunting to see all of the information that you will have to memorize for the exam, so it may be high yield at times to simplify your drug charts (like microbio/viro charts) by only including side effects that are specific for that drug. It doesn’t make sense to memorize that a certain anti-seizure medication causes SJ syndrome since most other anti-seizures also cause SJ syndrome. Writing out maybe 2-3 drug-specific side effects in your condensed chart will be high yield while studying unless you have super memory then I guess you can go memorize every last side effects. You won’t need to know every last side effect each drug induces since the exam question will usually list multiple side effects associated with that drug or it will state a side effect that is specific only to that drug. For example, the drug Lacosamide is the only anti-epileptic that prolongs the PR interval in the heart. No other anti-epileptic has that side effect so if this was mentioned in an exam question, this should immediately raise flags that the drug is Lacosamide. The first exam includes several math questions related to drug dosing. Be sure to know your drug math really really well otherwise you will get stuck on math problems during the exam. Spend time figuring out the math questions on the practice problems they give you and pay attention during the pharm workshop when they do some practice questions. Although the workshop is not graded, it is in your best interest to come prepared to answer questions as if you are about to take the exam. If you come unprepared you won’t be able to answer any of the questions and you will take nothing out of the workshop. Spend some time learning the math if you are not good at it, a lot of people missed these points on the exam because they “don’t like math” or “math is not their thing” or “pharm math problems are confusing”. Spend the time to figure this out, you will need every point you can get from this class. Remember that 20% of this year’s relatively high performing class failed pharm. This means on test day you are still not strong at drug math, go ahead and flag the question on the exam and move on. Come back to it only after you have finished everything else on the exam. A point is a point and it doesn’t make sense to spend 10 min on a math question when you could’ve answered 7 other questions in that time. Save it for the end where you can better gauge how much time you have left to focus on those problems. The first pharm exam, I thought, was full of physiology type of questions especially cell receptors. Know EVERYTHING about all the types of cell receptors and every physiological effect/function upstream and downstream of the receptor. So many times the question would start off with a patient presenting with certain symptoms and the question would ask what the mechanism of action of the drug prescribed is. In this second order question you would have to figure out in your head what is wrong with the patient and drug is indicated for that patient. Then to answer the question, you have to know what the mechanism of action of that drug is. They can make it even harder by asking what would the downstream affect be in the target cell for the drug that is indicated based on the patient’s symptoms presented. This would be considered a 3rd order question and Dr. Scully is notorious for tricky questions. He will even warn you in class to be prepared for those types of question. Though Scully may seem evil, he is actually one of my favorite professors from post bacc due to his engaging lectures (Labranche and Speelman were the other favorites). The first exam is based on 7 lectures, but I thought it was still easier than the second pharm exam that was based on 5 lectures simply because there was way more physiology related question on the exam. The second exam I thought was a lot harder because there was a lot more drugs we had to know and each drug we learned had several slides MOA, liver enzyme induction/inhibition effects, massive amounts of side effects, on top of multiple drugs to treat the same condition and knowing which one is the right choice given the situation. I believe that if you truly spend your time making sure you not only just memorize the drug chart you make, but you must spend an equivalent amount of time understanding the physiology behind the drugs. Just like physio, memorization will maybe only get you to a C. If you want that A/B range then you will need to know your physio. So again, pay attention in physio first semester! The final is not any easier than the exams since they know it is still fresh in your brain. The only thing they “give” you on the final I saw was that the answer choices were slightly easier to eliminate when searching for the answer. Other than that, they will not give you a handout on the final. I did get an A in pharm (barely), but I have never studied so much for a class in my life and in hindsight I feel proud of myself for doing that. This class will most likely push you to your limits and at no point during studying or during the exam did I feel like I would do well in this class. “Dr.Kobebryant” here on the forums did even better than me on the pharm exams, I’m sure he would like to chime in on how to be successful in this class. I think the memorization “practice” I got out of microbio, virology, immunology totally prepared me to be successful in this class. Difficulty: Hard. No, you cannot memorize your way through this.


    Intro to Clinical Med:

    This is a 1 credit class that I guess is supposed to be an easy A, but its curriculum radically changed for us compared to the previous years making it more difficult and possibly a quick fail if you don’t spend time for this class. This class is strictly directed study and there are no lectures. You will be assigned readings from an OMSII level textbook that roughly parallels what you are concurrently learning in anatomy which is pretty helpful since that makes it relevant to you. The readings can be very long and can take a better part of a day to read. The learning objectives for this class are extremely vague and I would suggest to highlight anything of importance as you read the book and write/type out notes that you can refer to while studying. Luckily, someone in our class made quizlet flashcards based on what she thought was important and shared it with us on the class facebook and they turned out to be super helpful. There are online open book unlimited timed quizzes for every unit, so make sure you get 100% on all of those because the exam questions are always hard and you need every point you can get. Thankfully the final was pretty straightforward. Difficulty: Medium-Hard. Yes memorize your way through this, it’s the only way.


    TL;DR: Physiology and Biochemistry is hard first semester, Anatomy and Pharmacology is hard the second semester. Don’t forget your physiology and histology classes first semester as you will be using your knowledge in those classes the next semester. People good at memorization will excel in classes like Microbio, Anatomy, Pathology while people good at conceptual topics will excel in classes like Physiology, Biochemistry. And people who are good at both memorization and conceptual topics will excel in pharmacology. Work hard first semester and get as close to a 4.0 as possible so you will not be overly stressed second semester. Don’t fail pharm.


    I hope you guys found this write up helpful and I mainly wrote it because if I had a guide like this prior to the post-bacc, I might have gotten an even better in the program and would’ve had less stress. The post-bacc is definitely a learning experience, but it does help to know whats coming at you. Let me know if you guys have any questions or need clarification and I really hope this has helped you as you prepare for the post-bacc. Good luck!
     
    Rubadux, afajayan, weare1771 and 3 others like this.
  16. DexterMorganSK

    DexterMorganSK The Blood Guy

    404
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    Jul 16, 2016
    @nasuthar

    Thank you so much for taking your time and writing about the classes in such great details. I'm sure all the incoming appreciate your time. Congratulations on your acceptance, btw. If I get accepted to this program then now, I now have an idea on how to tackle each class, thanks to you and the others that provided the feedbacks.

    I just have another question regarding the curriculum. I thought that you take all of the classes at the same for that semester, but it seems like you take Physio first then another course like biochem, and then another? Is this correct, that it kind of follows a block-like-curriculum where you would finish one course then move to another or is it all mixed in?

    Also, which textbook did you use for Path (was it Robbins?).

    Thank you!
     
    nasuthar likes this.
  17. midawa

    midawa

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    Dec 26, 2015

    You take more than one class at a time, but you finish some before you start others. For example, first semester you will take Physio and Biochem at the same time, but will finish Physio before you start Microbio. In spring semester you will have Anatomy and Pathology together throughout the semester and then for the last two exams you will have Anatomy, Pathology and Pharmacology. Immunology and Virology finish within the first two exams of Spring semester.

    And yes that was the textbook for Path
     
    afajayan, DexterMorganSK and nasuthar like this.
  18. nasuthar

    nasuthar

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    Jul 31, 2015
    Yup what's Midawa said. I think the sole reason they squash physiology into the first 6 weeks is to kick you into good studying habits early on so that if you mess up in that class you still have most of semester to focus and do better in the other classes relatively easier classes.

    Someone definitely put in a lot of time structuring the post bacc program, use it to your advantage as the whole semester schedule is given to you on the first day. Planning is key!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
    DexterMorganSK likes this.
  19. DocE305

    DocE305 5+ Year Member

    181
    45
    Nov 8, 2011
    Miami, FL
    MDApps:
    Would any of you know if there are any places that do not have a 12 month minimum and will do a 8-9 month lease?
     
  20. Dental Buddy 2017

    Dental Buddy 2017

    15
    1
    Dec 9, 2016
    Congratulations on the hardwork you guys put in. Looks like it definitly paid off. Just a few questions; (1) is there a lot of pre-dent students in the program? (2) After the spring semester ended, how long did you guys have to wait to hear about your acceptances?
     
  21. nasuthar

    nasuthar

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    Jul 31, 2015
    There aren't that many pre-dents in the program, I think we had about 15. Acceptances come out based on your first semester GPA. This year 3.4+ came out February, 3.2+ came out a few weeks before semester end and everyone else they waited until after the semester ended and I think those acceptances already came out this year based on friends fb posts.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  22. Schultra

    Schultra

    6
    3
    May 2, 2017
    For those without the letter of contingency, some people got status changes the day grades came out some are still waiting.
     
  23. byahnoob

    byahnoob 2+ Year Member

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    Dec 17, 2014
    not sure if you would know this but out of those 15 how many actually made it to dental school?
    i probably missed it but haven't read 1 single dent writing on here about the program
     
  24. midawa

    midawa

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    Dec 26, 2015
    I'm not a pre-dental so I don't know how true this information is, but this is what I gathered from some people.


    We had a huge drop in our pre-dental students from fall to spring semester. When spring semester started only 4 pre-dental students were in the program (not sure why so many dropped, I'm assuming it was grades but it seems like a lot). Of those 4 students I believe 2 were accepted to LECOM's program and 1 was accepted into another program.
     
  25. PAtoDO

    PAtoDO

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    Jun 17, 2016
    Hi can you tell me what is the letter of contingency ? Are some people given one at the start of program saying they are automatically accepted if they achieve a certain gpa and some aren't given the letter ? Thanks in advance !
     
  26. nasuthar

    nasuthar

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    53
    Jul 31, 2015
    Letter of contingency accompanies your acceptance letter. Interviews are in January after your first semester. Everyone with a 3.0+ in first semester will be interviewed and then acceptances to med school will go out based on your first semester GPA. Most 3.4+ students go their letters before the end of February and 3.2+ in late March/early April. Everyone else was after the end of second semester. The contingency letter requires 2 things: maintaining an overall 3.0+ in the post bacc program and achieving at least a minimum of a C in every class (70%+). Some students received contingency of 75%+ but I believe that was a mistake.

    No one is given an admission at the start of the program. Everyone starts off as a blank slate and only this program matter to the school at that point. Basically your extra curricular shave already been deemed sufficient, but you need to prove yourself academically.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
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  27. jig11111

    jig11111

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    Jan 13, 2016
    Do they accepts International students(Canadian) ?
     
  28. SashKoshOMGosh

    SashKoshOMGosh

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    Jul 26, 2016
    Hi, I'm in incoming MS1 and was a med post bacc, not dental, but I am friends with a dental post back from last year. There were 15 dental to start, but all but 4 failed out before spring semester. One of those 4 withdrew because she didn't want to go to dental school anymore. Out of the other 3, I believe only 1 student got above a 3.0 and was accepted. This program is very heavy with physiology based content (both semesters). I am not familiar with what a pre-dent takes in undergrad compared to pre-meds, but my friend told me that her undergrad career did not adequately prepare her for this program. Also, most of the things you will learn as a dental post bacc student is more affiliated with medicine. Very little of the material is dental based (i.e. You have to learn GI physiology, cardiology, abdomen anatomy, etc. Again, I'm not sure what is taught in dental school. ). I am not trying to discourage you from this program, but just know that 1/15 students is not a very high percentage and you will likely have to work harder than the pre-meds in your class at some subjects if you haven't had access to the same undergrad coursework. Personally, I do not think I could have made the cut and matriculated this year without my rigorous undergrad education. Physiology and Anatomy are worth 33% of your total post bacc GPA. Get a C in either of those classes and you will really have a hard time digging yourself out of that hole. Also, it is worth mentioning that the grading system is a little odd. 90-100% is an A. So you can work your tail off and land a 89.3% and still receive the same grade (a B) as someone who gets a 79.5%. For me, this was a negative about the program since 4 credit hours of my grades landed exactly at a 89.4%. Over all, this cost me quite a bit GPA points and was the difference between me getting my contingent acceptance letter in late wintertime compared to having to wait until after the final. Yes, getting exactly 4 more additional test questions right at some point would have made all the difference. My point is, there are not many points for each class, so every single point means everything. There is no room for a "bad test" if you want an A, especially in the 1 credit hour classes. There were some classes that didn't even break being worth 100 points and if you missed 8 points you already couldn't possible get an A. I'm not trying to scare you and over all, the program prepared me very well, but do NOT take anything lightly and study your arse off from the very first day of class. Good luck to you!

    Side note: get to be friends with some MS1 and MS2s early on. They are really good at helping you with resources and inside information on what will likely be on each test. They are a godsend. LECOM offers free tutoring and even if you don't think you need tutoring, having someone who can give you the low down on each class and professor is worth signing up in my opinion.
     
  29. jdrb0130

    jdrb0130

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    Oct 28, 2015
    Is it too late to apply?
     
  30. nasuthar

    nasuthar

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    Jul 31, 2015
    No, I know a bunch that applied in June/July that got in


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  31. radicalpatella

    radicalpatella

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    Feb 6, 2017
    A decision has been made....getting pretty nervous! I hear the letter comes in about a week after the portal change? Anybody get in recently? What stats?

    I'm applying with a 2.8sgpa, 2.85cgpa, 28 MCAT, 112 AIS. I know my stats are low, but I have been retaking classes and got a 3.75 this past semester and I'm hoping I can prove that I am ready for advanced level classes. If replacement grades were still a thing I'd have a 3.02 sgpa and a 2.98cgpa :(
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2017 at 9:04 AM
  32. byahnoob

    byahnoob 2+ Year Member

    209
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    Dec 17, 2014
    How long has your app been in review for?
     
  33. radicalpatella

    radicalpatella

    12
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    Feb 6, 2017
    It was under review for over a week. It was moved to "a decision has been made" yesterday.
     
  34. voltraditions

    voltraditions

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    Thursday
    How are people doing with housing so far? I was accepted a couple of weeks ago and have started looking but have not heard back from the apartment complexes I messaged.
     
  35. Floss_Boss_347

    Floss_Boss_347

    1
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    Thursday
    Former pre-dental post bacc here. Completed the program, but did not make the grade to matriculate. I am currently typing up a full review of my experience in the program as a pre-dent, but in the meantime, if anyone has any specific questions, please post them here so I can address them in my review.
     
    Scholar32 likes this.
  36. Ssha

    Ssha

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    Jun 1, 2016
    Would you say this is a good program for someone with not so low grades? Like 3.4 GPA, 3.0 sgpa, 505 MCAT? Would it be better to apply to the DO program directly?
     
  37. voltraditions

    voltraditions

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    Thursday
    I believe they need all materials by September 1st
     
  38. Ssha

    Ssha

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    Jun 1, 2016
    Thank you I just checked, they said August 1!
     
  39. Ssha

    Ssha

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    Jun 1, 2016
    Would you say this is a good program for someone with not so low grades? Like 3.4 GPA, 3.0 sgpa, 505 MCAT? Would it be better to apply to the DO program directly?
     
  40. JD1957

    JD1957

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    Mar 20, 2016
    I think with your stats you have an OK shot at the newer DO schools or established lower tier DO schools with low requirements, depends on your extracurriculars and how early you apply. However if you don't get in DO schools with your stats, this program will definitely help, especially with your lower GPA/higher MCAT combo. At this point in the cycle I would apply to both post bac and DO programs, so for some reason you don't get a DO acceptance for fall 2018 you would still be working to improve that GPA in post-bac at the same time and try again next cycle. But of course you'll be spending an extra 30K and be at the risk of not doing well in post-bac and put your pre-med career in jeopardy. Just make sure you do well and it'll all be worth it.
     
  41. Ssha

    Ssha

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    Jun 1, 2016
    Wow. That is great advice! Only problem I have is the timing. If I apply to DO schools now I won't know if I got exepted until early 2018. while post baccs tell you about being accepted now & start in august/sept. So either way I would have to choose to do a post bacc in sept or not to and just work/volenteer. You know what I mean?
     
  42. JD1957

    JD1957

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    Mar 20, 2016
    Yeah, I think doing the post bac and perform well will pretty much open your door to an acceptance to DO school for fall 2018, especially at LECOM. As opposed to not doing it and just work/volunteer, where you put yourself at risk of not getting any acceptance for fall 2018 and delay another year. Like I said your current stats should be OK but, imo, not good enough to the point where I would feel comfortable putting on all my chips in it since I wouldn't want to delay medical school another year. But my speculation could also be wrong...

    One thing I can tell you is that even if you get accepted with your current stats and still do this post-bac program and do well, it will be worth the effort and money since it will prepare you well for medical school.

    And I can't stress this enough, if you do decide to do the program though, be ready to work your ass off since it's very hard to do well, and not doing well (at least stay above 3.0) in this post bac will pretty much doom your whole career, but I still think if you can do well it'll all be worth it.
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2017 at 10:55 PM
    DexterMorganSK likes this.
  43. Ssha

    Ssha

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    Jun 1, 2016
    Hmmm I see what you're saying. It makes sense to be on the safe side and do the post bacc program.
    When I submit my application in July/August do I need to mention doing the post bacc? If yes, where/ how should I mention it?
     
  44. JD1957

    JD1957

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    Mar 20, 2016
    If I'm not mistaken, you put it under Planned courses. And yes you'll have to mention that you're doing the program, DO schools will most likely want to know how you do in the program.
     
  45. Ssha

    Ssha

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    Jun 1, 2016
    Thank you for the meaningful advice!
     
    JD1957 likes this.
  46. vle

    vle

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    Jun 21, 2016
    Woodbridge, VA
    Has anyone had trouble obtaining a letter of recommendation? I no longer keep in contact with my science professors. I emailed them to see if they would accept a letter from my EMT course instructor instead :(

    Any advice?
     
  47. DantheManimal

    DantheManimal

    287
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    Oct 24, 2015
    Yes this is a good program for those stats. Mine were similar: 3.0 GPA, 3.4 sGPA, 505 MCAT. I got 3 II's and zero acceptances, so I did the post bac
     
    JD1957 and Ssha like this.
  48. license43

    license43

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    Jan 12, 2016
    Well not sure if LECOM recognize EMT as a science course and its good you emailed to make sure. If it does not count as science, then I guess you have no choice but to email your previous science professors, I am pretty sure at least 1 would complete a LOR, even if you had about a B in that course.
     
    vle likes this.
  49. Ssha

    Ssha

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    Jun 1, 2016
    Ahh I see so you applied to DO schools and then when you didn't get accepted, you did a post bacc?
     
  50. nasuthar

    nasuthar

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    Jul 31, 2015
    Yes I also think this is a good program for you. I had stats similar to yours and I would recommend the program and I did pretty well. But like what others have said, this program is nothing like undergrad in the sense you will have to study daily and on the weekends due to the amount of information presented to you.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  51. Ssha

    Ssha

    105
    7
    Jun 1, 2016
    Yea! I heard that too and that the first semester is easier than the second. Is this true and in what sense is it different from undergrad?
     

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