Ophtho Residency Chances to FMG with such stats?

Discussion in 'Ophthalmology: Eye Physicians & Surgeons' started by wcsurgeonmd, Apr 20, 2017.

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What path do you advise me to take based on the above?

  1. 1. Residency here in the US

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  2. 2. Residency at my home institution

    100.0%
  1. wcsurgeonmd

    wcsurgeonmd 2+ Year Member

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    Jan 8, 2015
    Stats:
    • FMG from a non ACGME-certified school (yeah...i know looks bad already :/)
    • Honors on 2 away ophtho electives the US
    • 2 first authorship papers here in ophthalmology
    • 1 abstract submitted to AAO for review (might or might not end up as a poster in AAO's annual meeting this year)
    • Small author/reviewer activities on the side
    • Ready to go into research for 2 years (haven't found a position yet...)
    • Not sure if I want to practice in the US for the rest of my life.
    NB: 1 position back at home institution, 99% guaranteed for me to get in since I'm a top student there. Given those limited stats, what do you advise me to do? Fully honest discouraging advices are more than welcome. I'm torn by which path to take, so please help me tip off the balance!

    Thank you a tons if you're able to reply to my questions!
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2017 at 9:50 AM
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  3. sb247

    sb247 wait...you mean I got in? 2+ Year Member

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    Galt's Gulch
    Board scores?
     
  4. wcsurgeonmd

    wcsurgeonmd 2+ Year Member

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    Step 1: 262; Step 2 CK: 251; Step 2CS: Pass
     
  5. DrZeke

    DrZeke yzarc gniog ylwolS 10+ Year Member

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    Are you from the US? Do you have any ties or family there?


    Sent from my iPhone using SDN mobile
     
  6. Slide

    Slide Haters gonna hate 10+ Year Member

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    Oct 12, 2005
    Your scores and resume looks great. In fact, if you were a US graduate from an ACGME-accredited school, you would be considered an extremely sought out candidate. Unfortunately, that part of your application will be the biggest detriment to your success in matching.

    Is this a school in the Caribbean or international (e.g. UK, Europe, Asia, etc.)? The first decision you really need to make is it you want to stay in the US after you finish residency. Understandably, it can change throughout residency or afterwards, but it is an important one to commit to before doing so. If you don't, there is no need to put yourself through the stress of going through the US match. If you do, despite your impressive resume, expect to do 1-2 years of research at a US institution prior to matching. It is extremely difficult to match in the US from a non-ACGME affiliated school right out of medical school. I do know a good number of FMG graduates that have matched, and they have had similar impressive resumes. All of them required at least a year of research in order to obtain great letters from attendings in the US, and the letters were often written by big names in their respective subspecialty. The ones that have finished residency are practicing in the US and enjoy it immensely. The ones I know still in residency or have matched have told me it was an arduous route but worth it enough to go through (they too want to stay in the US).

    You may know this already, but the issue with ophthalmology is that they are so many qualified candidates per spot, and there is an obligation to match US graduates for many program directors.
     
    wcsurgeonmd and DrZeke like this.
  7. DrZeke

    DrZeke yzarc gniog ylwolS 10+ Year Member

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    As someone who worked closely in research with many of these types of applicants I couldn't agree more with what Slide has said. But having permanent residents status as oppose to a visa also makes a HUGE difference. It would be helpful if you could provide us with more info.


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  8. wcsurgeonmd

    wcsurgeonmd 2+ Year Member

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    Jan 8, 2015
    Sadly I'm not :/
     
  9. wcsurgeonmd

    wcsurgeonmd 2+ Year Member

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    Jan 8, 2015
    I'm still here doing my final rotation in the US on a B1/B2 visa, no green card, not a permanent resident...just a hard working guy with big dreams...
     
  10. wcsurgeonmd

    wcsurgeonmd 2+ Year Member

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    Not from the US, just here on a B1/B2 visa, no ties or family.
     
  11. wcsurgeonmd

    wcsurgeonmd 2+ Year Member

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    Thank you so much for the kind words and for the thorough reply. I was told that it is a competitive specialty before I came here to the US to do my electives but I never imagined it is THAT hard...I come from a third world country, not a US citizin, not a green card holder, and no clue what to do next :p
     
  12. RookTookIt

    RookTookIt SDN Lifetime Donor Lifetime Donor 7+ Year Member

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    I think first and foremost you really need to decide if you want to stay in the US to practice in the long-term. If not, I would take the position back home in a heartbeat and not look back.

    If you do decide you want to be in the US, I think it would be difficult but possible. You seem like somebody who might be able to really convince a department that you would be an asset to their program if they knew you personally (instead of just on paper). If I were you I would try to get a research position at whatever program (preferably not top tier) and work your ass off there. Get in touch with the PD early on, try to attend as many clinical conferences as possible, spend as much time in the clinic as your research allows, help any attending/trainee/technician with anything they may need, just generally BECOME a part of the program. In an ideal world you would end up matching there, but even if you don't you will have made great contacts and be able to get excellent letters of recommendation. I am fairly certain that I matched this year because of a letter of recommendation that touched on my work ethic, willingness to help anyone, and ability to make difficult long days feel more lighthearted. Good luck, I'm rooting for you!
     
    DrZeke likes this.
  13. wcsurgeonmd

    wcsurgeonmd 2+ Year Member

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    Jan 8, 2015
    Thank you for your reply. I guess I still have a lot of thinking to do and take other factors such as practicing in the US into consideration though I have no strings attached and I definitely don't mind staying here in the US with and doing what I love. Congratulations on matching, I'm sure you'll do great and thanks for the support!
     

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